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Lahore Silk Route Caravan Kashgar Tour

Lahore Silk Route caravan Kashgar Tour Overview

On 14 days of history and culture tour, a delightful journey that takes you from the Mughal era Gardens of Lahore, Forts and Mosques to the ancient cities of Taxila and myriad of cultures and stunning scenaries along the KKH to Hunza, villages to the fertile Ghizer valleys and vibrant cities of Kashgar and Urmqi.

Lahore Silk Route caravan Kashgar Tour Highlights

  • Visit the most holy sites and destinations in Pakistan
  •   Step closer to birth pace of Buddhism; try to understand the faith, and the unique related activities there.
  • If you are a believer, just take a pilgrim along the way and enjoy the spectacular scenery and profound culture in this land.
  • enjoy the amazing and mysterious places, mountains, temples & stupas in scared places!
  • Encounter the paths trodden by Buddha in all their splendour and majesty

Lahore Silk Route caravan Kashgar Tour Itinerary

  Days        Activities

  • ARRIVAL in Lahore

    One of our staff will meet you at the airport and escort you to the hotel.

    Today either you can relax or you can enjoy an exploratory walk in the old part of Lahore Punjab Pakistan; wander past the vegetable and spice markets, beautifully carved old houses and trucks, cows pestering the vegetable vendors, catch traditional craftsmen at work in silver and gold bazaars .You will then continue on the Mall Road – before arriving at the gleaming provincial capital, Lahore. You pass shining new buildings and  park areas.

    Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing

  • Lahore

    Today morning after breakfast at hotel we will move out on The Mall Road, which was a modern thoroughfare lined with exquisite buildings of great public and private utility during British time.

    We will stop over at Gymkhana Club or Little Britain opposite Lawrence Gardens to take a view of this symbol of prestige and a favorite haunt of men of diverse talents and fortune. The halls of club were built in memory of two Governors Sir John Lawrence and Sir Robert Montgomery.

    We will move to The Lahore Museum built by the British in Moghul Gothic style and opened in 1894.John Lockwood Kipling, Rudyard’s father was the museum’s first curator. It is the best museum in Pakistan with a superb collection of Moghal period includes illustrated manuscripts, miniatures, rugs and carvings. It also has excellent galleries of pre historic Pakistan and a superb collection of Buddhist stone sculpture. The famous Zam – Zama gun casted in 1760 stand in front of the Museum.

    From here we move to Royal Palace of Lahore Fort which rank in size and beauty with the Moghul forts at Delhi and Agra. Akbar began building it the 1560s on the site of an older fort. The fortress is located at the northern end of Lahore’s Walled City, and spreads over an area greater than 20 hectares. It contains 21 notable monuments, some of which date to the era of Emperor Akbar. The Lahore Fort is notable for having been almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century, when the Mughal Empire was at the height of its splendour and opulence.

    Though the site of the Lahore Fort has been inhabited for millennia,  the first record of a fortified structure at the site was in regard to an 11th-century mud-brick fort.

    The foundations of the modern Lahore Fort date to 1566 during the reign of Emperor Akbar, who bestowed the fort with an architectural style that featured Hindu motifs.

    Additions from the Shah Jahan period are characterized by luxurious marble with inlaid Persian floral designs, while the fort’s grand and iconic Alamgiri Gate was constructed by the last of the great Mughal Emperors, Aurangzeb, and faces the renowned Badshahi Mosque.

    After the fall of the Mughal Empire, the Lahore Fort was used as the residence of Ranjit Singh, founder of the Sikh Empire. The fort then passed to British colonialists after they annexed Punjab following their victory over the Sikhs at the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849.

    In 1981, the fort was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its outstanding repertoire of Mughal monuments dating from the era when the empire was at its artistic and aesthetic zenith.

    From here we walk to Badshahi Mosque built by Emperor Aurangzeb in 1674 after the mosques of Delhi and Agra. It consists of a huge square with a minaret at each corner. You can climb up the 204 steps to the top of one of the minarets for a bird’s eye view of the old city of Lahore.

    We will move for lunch to a local restaurant and enjoy the best local taste known the world over as Tanduri.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration, History

    Meals provided: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

  • Lahore

    After Breakfast we will go to Jahangir’s Tomb across the River Ravi ‘s bridge.

    The Tomb was built by his son Shah Jahan , of Taj Mahal fame in 1627. A 180 room hotel Akbari Serai was also built here by Shah Jahan in 1637 around spacious garden. The Tomb of Asif Khan father of Mumtaz Mahal is also here , the lady for whom the Taj Mahal was built in Agra.

    Lahore is considered the cultural capital of Pakistan because of its numerous colleges, places of learning, sports activities frequent stage plays etc.

    We will now move to impressive Shalimar Garden built by Shah Jahan in 1642 for the royal household, it follows the Moghul concept of the perfect walled garden with geometrically arranged ponds, fountains and marble pavilions, surrounded by flowers and fruit trees.

    Shalimar Garden ‘s Construction began in 1637 C.E. during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan and was completed in 1641.

    The Shalimar Gardens were laid out as a Persian paradise garden. The gardens measure 658 metres by 258 metres, and cover an area of 16 hectares east of Lahore’s Walled City. The gardens are enclosed by a brick wall that is famous for its intricate fretwork.

    In 1981 the Shalimar Gardens were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as they embody Mughal garden design at the apogee of its development.  The gardens date from the period when the Mughal Empire was at its artistic and aesthetic zenith.

    The gardens have been laid out from south to north in three levels of terraces, with levels spaced by 4–5 metres (13-15 feet) above the other, descending from south to north. The respective names of the three terraces have been listed as follows:

    The middle level terrace of the garden, known as the Faiz Bakhsh terrace

    The upper level or the third terrace named Farah Baksh meaning Bestower of Pleasure

    The middle level or the second terrace named Faiz Baksh meaning Bestower of Goodness

    The lower level terrace named Hayat Baksh meaning Bestower of Life

    Architecture of Shalimar Garden

    Shalimar Gardens draws inspiration from Central Asia, Kashmir, Punjab, Persia and the Delhi Sultanate. The Shalimar Gardens are laid out in the form of an oblong parallelogram, surrounded by a high brick wall, which is famous for its intricate fretwork. This garden was made on the concept of a Persian paradise garden. The gardens measure 658 meters north to south and 258 meters east to west.

    Fountains

    From this basin, and from the canal, rise 410 fountains, which discharge into wide marble pools. It is a credit to the creativity of Mughal engineers that even today scientists are unable to fully comprehend the water systems and thermal engineering from architectural blueprints. The surrounding area is rendered cooler by the flowing of the fountains, which is a particular relief for visitors during Lahore’s blistering summers, with temperature sometimes exceeding 120 °F (49 °C). The distribution of the fountains is as follows:

    The upper level terrace has 105 fountains.

    The middle level terrace has 152 fountains.

    The lower level terrace has 153 fountains.

    All combined, the Gardens has 410 fountains.

    The Gardens have 5 water cascades including the great marble cascade and Sawan Bhadoon.

    Later afternoon we will go to watch the Wahgah border flag lowering ceremony. The lowering of the flags ceremony at the Wagah border is a military practice, every evening before sunset at the Wagah border, which as part of the Grand Trunk Road was the only road link between these two countries before the opening of the Aman Setu in Kashmir in 1999.

    The spectacle of the ceremony attracts many visitors from both sides of the border, as well as international tourists.

    The drill is characterized by elaborate and rapid dance-like maneuvers. It is alternatively a symbol of the two countries’ rivalry, as well as brotherhood and cooperation between the two nations.

    The ceremony starts with a blustering parade by the soldiers from both the sides, and ends up in the perfectly coordinated lowering of the two nations’ flags. It is called the “beating retreat” border ceremony on the international level. One infantryman stands at attention on each side of the gate. As the sun sets, the iron gates at the border are opened and the two flags are lowered simultaneously.

    The flags are folded and the ceremony ends with a retreat that involves a brusque handshake between soldiers from either side, followed by the closing of the gates again.

    The soldiers of this ceremony are specially appointed and trained for this auspicious ceremony. Also they have additional beard and moustache policy in which they are paid additionally for it.

    After the ceremony we will drive back to Lahore for dinner and back to hotel.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration, History

    Meals provided: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

  • Lahore - Rohtas fort - khewra salt mine- katasraj temple- Islamabad

    After break fast will drive toward Rohtas Fort near Dina. is a historical garrison fort located near the city of Jhelum in Punjab, Pakistan. It was built under Afghan king Sher Shah Suri, to subdue the rebellious tribes of the northern Punjab region, in the 16th century. This fort is about 4 km in circumference.

    The Rohtas Fort was built to crush the local Ghakhar tribes of Potohar, who rebelled against the Sur dynasty after the Mughal emperor Humayun was ousted by the former.It took eight years to build the fort, it was captured by Mughal emperor Humayun in 1555. Nadir Shah, the Turkic ruler of Persia, Afghan ruler Ahmed Shah Abdali and the Maratha army also camped here during their respective campaigns in the Punjab region. Rohtas was also occasionally used for administrative purposes by the Sikh ruler Ranjit Singh after he captured it in 1825. Due to its location, massive walls, trap gates and 3 Baolis (stepped wells) it could withstand a major siege although it was never besieged.Most of the fort was built with ashlar stones collected from its surrounding villages such as Tarraki village. Some parts of the fort were built with bricks.

    The fort is irregular in shape and follows the contours of the hill it was constructed on. The fort is exactly 5.2 km in circumference. A 533 metre long wall divides the citadel (for the Chieftain) from other parts of the fort.

    The fortification has 68 bastions (towers) at irregular intervals. Out of the 3 Baolis, one of them is in the citadel and the rest are in the other parts of the fort. One of the Gates (Langar Khani) opens into the citadel and is a trap gate because it is in the direct line of fire of the bastions.

    The Khwas Khani gate is an example of double walling. A small enclave on the western side is a citadel within a citadel. It is accessible by only one gate and also had a very fine Baoli which suggests that it was meant for the Chief and his family. In this citadel there is a beautiful Mosque called the Shahi Mosque (Not to be confused with the one in Lahore). There are no palaces in the Fort except for a structure built by Raja Man Singh called the Haveli of Man Singh. It is built on the highest point of the citadel.

    After Rohtas Fort, we will go for lunch followed by visit to Khewra Salt mine.

    It is Pakistan’s largest and oldest salt mine and the world’s second largest and a major tourist attraction. Its history dates back to its discovery by Alexander’s troops in 320 BC, but it started trading in the Mughal era.

    The main tunnel at ground level was developed by Dr. H. Warth, a mining engineer, in 1872 during British rule. After independence, the Pakistan Mineral Development Corporation took over the mine, which still remains the largest source of salt in the country, producing more than 350,000 tons per annum of about 99% pure halite.

    The salt reserves at Khewra were discovered when Alexander the Great crossed the Jhelum and Mianwali region during his Indian campaign. The mine was discovered, however, not by Alexander, nor by his allies, but by his army’s horses, when they were found licking the stones.  Ailing horses of his army also recovered after licking the rock salt stones. During the Mughal era the salt was traded in various markets, as far away as Central Asia. On the downfall of the Mughal empire, the mine was taken over by Sikhs.

    We will go into the mine on a train. There are numerous pools of salty water inside. The Badshahi Mosque was built in the mining tunnels with multi-colored salt bricks about fifty years ago.

    Other artistic carvings in the mine include a replica of Minar-e-Pakistan, a statue of Allama Iqbal, an accumulation of crystals that form the name of Muhammad in Urdu script, a model of the Great Wall of China and another of the Mall Road of Murree

    A clinical ward with 20 beds was established in 2007, costing 10 million rupees for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory diseases using salt therapy.

    We will also visit  75-meter-high (245 feet) Assembly Hall; Pul-Saraat, a salt bridge with no pillars over a 25-meters-deep (80-foot-deep) brine pond; Sheesh Mahal (Palace of Mirrors), where salt crystals are light pink.

    After salt mine we will visit Katasraj Temple, which  is a Hindu temple complex situated in Katas village near Choa Asidan shah.

    Dedicated to Shiva, the temple has, according to Hindu legend, existed since the days of Mahābhārata and the Pandava brothers spent a substantial part of their exile at the site and later Krishna himself laid the foundation of this temple and established his hand made Shelving in it.

    Prehistoric tools and weapons such as axes and knives made of granite, and artifacts like terracotta bangles and pottery have been unearthed at the Katasraj site. The latter have been found to be similar to those excavated in Harappa, but have not been dated for want of expert opinion. The fascinating Salt Ranges have a vast archaeological treasure still hidden underground. The Salt Ranges have also been yielding prehistoric finds. While some local experts place the fossils discovered in the period between 6000 and 7000 BC.

    The Katas site houses the Satgraha, a group of seven ancient temples, remains of a Buddhist stupa, a few medieval temples, havelis and some recently constructed temples, scattered around a pond considered holy by Hindus.

    The temples at Katas are mostly constructed on square platforms. The elevation of the sub shrines seems to form a series of cornices with small rows of pillars, crowned by a ribbed dome.

    After Katasraj visit, in the evening we will drive to Islamabad.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration, History

    Meals provided: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

    Drive: 8 – 9 hrs

  • Islamabad - Rawalpindi

    After breakfast, we will visit Rawalpindi, which is located on the Pothohar Plateau, known for the existence of a Buddhist community, particularly in neighboring town of Taxila, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The city was destroyed during the invasion of Mahmud of Ghazni before being taken over by Gakhars who went on to name the city as “Rawalpind” in 1493. In 1765, the Gakhars were defeated as Rawalpindi became part of the Sikh Empire. The city became part of the British Raj in 1849 and in 1851 became the largest garrison town for the British Indian Army.  After the partition of India in 1947, the city became home to the headquarters of Pakistan Army hence retaining its status as a major military city.

    We will visit famous Raja Bazar for sights and smell of Rawalpindi, followed by the visits of alleys of old Rawalpindi town including visits of Haveli Man singh and Lal Haveli.

    We will also visit the jewelers’ bazar, where the artisans are at work as well as embroidery workers to see their working.

    After this we will visit Truck Art painting site for an insight of this living art in Pakistan and meet the artist at work there.

    Pakistan’s ‘truck art’ is now quite a well-known ‘genre’ around the world. For long, it has been an homegrown art-form in South Asia, especially in Pakistan, where the whole idea of decorating trucks (also, lorries and even rickshaws) with complex floral patterns and poetic calligraphy, has evolved in the most radiant and innovative manner.

    Our next stop would be Heritage(folk lore) Museum.

    The Heritage Museum is the first state museum of ethnology in Pakistan which presents the history and living traditions of the people of Pakistan both from the mainstream and the remotest regions of the country.

    The Lok Virsa Folk Heritage Museum offers an enchanting journey spanning from the neolithic cultures of South Asia to the present day folk heritage and traditions of Pakistan. One can traverse through several thousand years of history in the space of a walk through the extensive corridors of the museum.

    The museum shows the evolution of culture and tradition through the ages, accounting for most of the cultural changes and influences along the way. Every gallery of the museum imparts the essence of a bygone era, replete with the traditions, costumes, jewelry and folklore, and ending with depictions of the present folk heritage of the four provinces of Pakistan. Passing through the gallery called ‘Pottery through the ages’ one sees ancient pottery from thousands of years ago, including artifacts such as cooking stoves and pots, pitchers, plates, and grain containers etc.

    After museum our next stop would be Shah Faisal Mosque, which is a major tourist attraction, and is referred as a contemporary and influential feature of Islamic architecture. Combined the structure cover an area of 54,000 square ft, the mosque dominates the landscape of Islamabad.

    It is located on an elevated area of land against a picturesque backdrop of the national park on the foothills of Margalla Hills, the westernmost foothills of the Himalayas. The largest mosque in Pakistan, the Faisal Mosque was the largest mosque in the world from 1986 until 1993.

    The mosque features a contemporary design consisting of eight sides of concrete shell and is inspired by a Bedouin tent.

    Construction of the mosque began in 1976 after a $120 million grant from Saudi King Faisal, whose name the mosque bears. The unconventional design by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay was selected after an international competition.  Without a typical dome, the mosque is shaped like a Bedouin tent, surrounded by four 260 feet (79 m) tall minarets. The design features eight-sided shell shaped sloping roofs forming a triangular worship hall which can hold 10,000 worshippers, while the surrounding porticoes and the courtyard up-to 200,000 more.

    After Faisal Mosque, our next stop would be Pir Sohawa view point Islamabad , where we would have to retreat our evening and dinner.

  • taxila

    After breakfast,  we will start our journey towards Taxila,” The World Oldest Existing City”, 32 kilometers from Islamabad spanning a rich history from 516 B.C to 600 A.D. In the 6th century B.C, the Achaemenians of Persia made it the Gandharan capital. Alexander the Great paused here en route from Swat.

    Situated strategically on a branch of the Silk Road, Taxila linked China to the West, Taxila reached its apogee between the 1st and 5th centuries. It is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia. The ruins of the four settlement sites at Taxila reveal the pattern of urban evolution on the Indian subcontinent through more than five centuries.

    The Mauryan emperor Ashoka, a patron of Buddhism, built a university here in 2nd century B.C biggest of its time in the world, to which pilgrims and scholars came from all over Asia. It requires two days to explore this richest archaeological sites of Asia but we will spent one day to view its excellent museum houses one of the best collections of Gandharan Buddhist in the world. Most of the archaeological sites of Taxila (600 BC to 500 AD) are located around Taxila Museum. For over the thousand years, Taxila remained famous as a center of learning Gandhara art of Sculpture, architecture, education, and Buddhism in the days of Buddhist glory.

    There are over 50 archaeological sites scattered in a radius of 30 kms around Taxila.  Some of the most important sites are: Dhamarajika Stupa and Monastery (300 BC  200 AD), Bhir Mound (600-200 BC), Sirkap (200 BC  600 AD), Jandial Temple (c.250 BC) and Julian Monastery (200- 600 AD).

    One of these sites, the Bihr mound, is associated with the historic event of the triumphant entry of Alexander the Great into Taxila. The archaeological sites of Saraikala, Bhir, Sirkap, and Sirsukh are collectively of unique importance in illustrating the evolution of urban settlement on the Indian subcontinent. The prehistoric mound of Saraikala represents the earliest settlement of Taxila, with evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age occupation. The Bhir mound is the earliest historic city of Taxila, and was probably founded in the 6th century BC by the Achaemenians. Its stone walls, house foundations, and winding streets represent the earliest forms of urbanization on the subcontinent. Bihr is also associated with Alexander the Great’s triumphant entry into Taxila in 326 BC.

    Sirkap was a fortified city founded during the mid-2nd century BC. The many private houses, stupas, and temples were laid out on the Hellenistic grid system and show the strong Western classical influence on local architecture. The city was destroyed in the 1st century by the Kushans, a Central Asian tribe. To the north, excavations of the ruins of the Kushan city of Sirsukh have brought to light an irregular rectangle of walls in ashlar masonry, with rounded bastions. These walls attest to the early influence of Central Asian architectural forms on those of the subcontinent.

    The Taxila serial site also includes Khanpur cave, which has produced stratified microlithic tools of the Mesolithic period, and a number of Buddhist monasteries and stupas of various periods. Buddhist monuments erected throughout the Taxila valley transformed it into a religious heartland and a destination for pilgrims from as far afield as Central Asia and China. Other Buddhist archaeological sites at Taxila include the Khader Mohra grouping, the Kalawan grouping, the Giri monasteries, the Kunala stupa and monastery, the Jandial complex, the Lalchack and the Badalpur stupa remains and monasteries, the Pipplian and the Bahalar stupa and remains.

    Evening drive back to Islamabad.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration, History

  • GILGIT / CHILAS

    We rise early to be at the airport in time for our flight to Gilgit. If the weather is good, we’ll be treated to one of the finest views available in the world of aviation, as we thread our way up the largest congregation of mountains of Karakoram, Hindukush, Himalaya and Indus River gorges, third longest in Asia and one of the deepest in the world. To our east is K2 (2nd highest in the world and Nanga Parbat (killer mountain) and countless peaks and glaciers.

    On arrival we are met by our local staff with jeeps and make the short transfer to the hotel. If the flight is unable to operate because of bad weather, we will resort to travel by road on Karakoram Highway (KKH) to Chilas.

    The drive is compensated by the beautiful scenery along the Karakoram highway and Indus gorges. The journey on the Karakoram Highway is most exciting and thrilling. It is a monument to the engineering feast and one of the most spectacular roads and the worlds highest metalled border crossing.

    It connects Pakistan and China stretching over a distance of 1300km between Islamabad and Kashgar, winding through three mountain ranges and following the ancient Silk route along the Indus Valley to the Chinese border at Khunjerab Pass.

    We pass through the historical town of Taxila, beautiful hill station of Abbottabad, quake affected lush green towns of Mansehra, Shinkiari and finally meet the great Indus on Thakot Bridge. From there onward the road snails along the bank of the Indus with contrasting landscape after every two kilometers through Kohistan valley.

    We pass through Besham, Dassu, Komila and Shatial to arrive at Chilas Diamir valley with many rocks carving and inscriptions along the way left by Chinese pilgrims and ancient travelers of 5th century A.D. Chilas was on the ancient caravan trail over the Babusar Pass into India.

    The drive through the Indus Gorge is guaranteed to knock your socks off! The view after crossing the Rai kot Bridge of Nanga Parbat is without any parallel. Standing at around 1,000 m. you see a mountain which rises to above 8,000 m! This is the largest land escarpment in the world.

    En route we will stop shortly at Shatial & Chilas to encounter ancient rock carvings, also stop at a unique point on the hilltop from where we can observe three great mountain ranges at a time, followed by a stop at Talliche Bridge to have a fine view of Nanga Parba.

    Near Gilgit we visit the impressive rock carvings of the Buddha at Kargah.

    Gilgit is like a square. From here, paths lead on to beautiful valleys, rivers, springs, waterfalls, plains and ancient settlements. Before Gilgit, a road turns to Skardu, and another to Naltar. The third one takes you to Hunza and all the way to Khunjerab Pass.

    The fourth leads you to Ghizer. A wayfarer travelling along with the Ghizer River reaches the Shandur Pass, after which comes Chitral.

    Ghizer is the land of colorful waters. Dotted with trees, this area is literally paradise on earth, and the Phunder valley (also spelled Phander), is the feather in its hat.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • CHILAS / GILGIT – GHIZER VALLEY

    After breakfast, we  travel along the Ghizer – Gilgit River to Gakuch to explore the Ghizar valley  and Upper Gahkuch stopping at photo vintage points.

    As we leave Gilgit and move forward, the Karakoram mountain range is left behind and in the lap of  Hindu Kush mountain range. As soon as we get on to Ghizer Road, the Ghizer River joins along to give us  company. Its cold waters filled with trout fish. Across the river are small settlements housing the locals.

    We move forward from Sher Qila and the towns of Gahkoch and Puniyal welcome all travellers on the main road. Gahkoch is the centre of this district. After Punial, there’s a small settlement on the right of the river, named Gich.

    The entire village is covered with grapevines filtering sunlight and filling the air up with the fragrance of grapes; this village is said to produce the most grapes in this region. You can’t help but fall in love with the grape clusters hanging off vines that crawl all over the village.

    Ghizer joins with Wakhan strip on its north-west, and China on its northern borders. On its west, there is Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and on its east is situated Gilgit.

    This district is also connected to Tajikistan through Yasin valley and Karumber Pass. The population mostly comprises of Gujjars. The word Ghizer is derived from local language’s “Gharz”, which translates to “immigrant”.

    The rulers of Chitral were known as Mehtar. The people they didn’t ‘approve of’ were exiled to Gupis in Ghizer. These people soon occupied most of the Gupis.   Gupis has been serving as a junction between yasin and phander valley. The beautiful landscape of Gupis valley is breathtaking. The turquoise water of river flowing along the road and surrounding fields and forests present a very charming scene to the visitors.

    It is the central place from all valleys like phandar, yasin. poniyal etc. We will visit Khalti Lake and Phander lake.

    Phander valley which is commonly called “Little Kashmir”. Phander Lake is one of the most famous tourist spots in the entire region. Phander valley was the bread basket for the whole Northern Areas. The name of Ghizer comes from the name of a village ‘Ghizer’ that is situated in the vicinity of Phander The deep blue lake in Phander offers a magnificent view and is basically the home of trout fish.

    Located at a 20-30 minutes drive from Gupis, the Khalti lake is one of the very beautiful lakes found in Ghizer district of Gilgit Baltistan.

    Khalti lake is famous for being habitat of trout fish. The lake is formed due to stretch of river near the village of Khalti. The dark blue water of lake on a clear day looks very charming. The lake usually freezes during winter and villagers of Khalti use to walk on this.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • Yasin valley - ishkoman valley

    After breakfast, we  travel along the Yasin valley to Darkot, to view Darkot village and Yasin valley. stopping at photo vintage points. It’s attractive villages, carefully cultivated fields and orchards offer a blend of life time experience in remote valleys of Hindukush.The summer in Yasin valley has great attraction not only because of scenic beauty but it also offers avenues from adventure lovers.

    We will visit Darkut, a historical place as it has been a passage way for important persons. It was this pass that George Hayward crossed in 1870 when he was murdered. The Chinese army lead by a Korean General crossed Darkut in 747AD and conquered Gilgit. Sandi is the largest village in Yasin valley and it is famous for a Fort from the time of Gohar Aman.

    After Yasin we will visit Ishkoman valley. The valley has immense natural beauty in the shape of alpine meadows, massive glacier, perennials streams. It is the home of several passes treks and alpine lakes.

    Evening drive back to Khalti lake.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • NALTAR - HUNZA

    After breakfast, we will go to scenic Naltar valley, home to flowery meadows, lakes and spectacular greenery. The peaks surrounding Naltar Valley have dozens of 5000m summits. Naltar was a British hill station and has some Pakistan military facilities, including a Pakistan Air Force winter survival school with ski lift

    Naltar receives more rainfall than other mountains/valleys  in the range , and its alpine forests are refreshing compared to the mainly arid Karakoram.

    We will visit Naltar view point and upper Naltar Lakes.

    In the afternoon we will drive to Hunza with en route stop at Rakaposhi View point, which offers a superb view of Rakaposhi Peak. For dinner and our overnight stay we drive to Hunza. The valleys of Hunza and Nagar are some of the most beautiful valleys in the northern parts of Pakistan. The people of this area are known for their legendary good health, longevity and hospitality. Rakaposhi accessible only by 4 to 5 hrs. Walk from the road, dominates the whole valley. This area is full of apricots, apples, grapes and peaches.

    Main attraction of this road journey is Rakaposhi Base Camp and Altit and Baltit Forts. Baltit Fort is an ancient fort in the Hunza valley in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Founded in the 1st CE, it has been on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative list since 2004.

    In the past, the survival of the feudal regime of Hunza was ensured by the impressive fort, which overlooks Karimabad. The foundations of the fort date back to 700 years ago, with rebuilds and alterations over the centuries. In the 16th century the local prince married a princess from Baltistan who brought master Balti craftsmen to renovate the building as part of her dowry. Visit around the area, you would feel as if you’d stepped back in time in past period.

    After Baltit Fort  you go to Ganish village. Ganish is the oldest and first settlement on the ancient Silk Road in Hunza, and is the site of various ancient watch towers, traditional mosques, religious centers, and a reservoir.The Ali Gohar House in Ganish, is located next to one of the iconic shikaris (watchtowers) of the town. The 400-year-old house was awarded the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation in 2009

    Then we proceed to Altit Fort. Altit Fort is an ancient fort at Altit town in the Hunza valley,It was originally home to the hereditary rulers of the Hunza state who carried the title Mir.Altit Fort and in particular the Shikari tower is around 1100 years old, which makes it the oldest monument in the Gilgit–Baltistan.

    Then Let’s go up to the highest observation place at Duikar to enjoy 360-degree panoramic view and sunset reflections on peaks of lady finger, Haramosh peak, Rakaposhi and many others. This is one of the best elevated way to fully enjoy a sunset. Spiritually and physically, we would like you to feel the air as well. It will be unforgettable experience.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration, History

  • HUNZA - Nagar Excursion

    Today well have a full day sightseeing tour of Hunza and its surroundings. Our morning session will include a jeep excursion to the Nagar Valley to see the glacial formations at Hoper. Hoper also offers a fantastic view of the mountain peaks of the Hunza valley. After we return to Hunza we will visit the Baltit Fort Museum followed by the Ganesh Watch Tower and a walk through the Karimabad Bazaar, the down town of Hunza. Sunset and sunrise are the views one can remember forever.

    The valleys of Hunza and Nagar are some of the most beautiful valleys in the northern parts of Pakistan. The people of this area are known for their legendary good health, longevity and hospitality.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • HUNZA - SUST

    Another excursion day ahead, this time to Upper Hunza Valley, where we will first walk along the Passu and the Gulkin Glaciers. From here well go to visit the Gulmit Village, which will offer a nice experience while walking through the streets and between its traditional homes, a real image representing the old and traditional culture of this area. Then we proceed to Attabad lake, Husaini suspension bridge and Passu. Glacier. The glaciers are really eerie, almost alive, as they creak and melt in the sun. Rocks continually fall down as the ice melts.Experience the Passu Glacier cracking and spikes from the view point. it gives some of spectacular scenaries for photographers.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • SUST - TASHKURGAN

    Today morning, we ll drive to Khunjerab National Park, between Pakistan and China. After clearing custom & immigration formalities on the Pakistani side, we board the Governments transportation vehicle to continue our border-crossing – the worlds highest border crossing – into China.

    Khunjerab National Park at 4,934m.which half of the park is above 4,000m.  Khunjerab National Park is Pakistan’s third largest national park. It is adjacent to Taxkorgan Natural Reserve (1,400,000ha) in China.

    You will enjoy a short trip up to Khunjerab Pass on Karakoram Highway; it gives some of spectacular scenarios for photographers of wild life. where you may have a sighting of endangered Marco Polo sheep, which is only found in this area in Pakistan. The park is also famous for its snow leopards. Some reports say that it might contain the highest density of these beautiful cats in the total Himalayan ecosystem, which is the natural habitat of these cats. Over 2,000 Siberian ibex, widely distributed and abundant in the park but absent from neighbouring China, are also present here.

    Other animals of this park are in the park include:

    Snow leopard (T),     Himalayan ibex (C),    Brown bear (T),    Tibetan red fox (C),    Tibetan wolf (T),    Blue sheep,    Marco Polo sheep,    Tibetan wild ass or kiang ,    Ermine (C),    Alpine weasel,    Stone martin (C),    Golden marmot (C),    Lynx (unconfirmed reports),    Large-eared pika (C),    Dhole (unconfirmed reports),    Cape hare (C),    Common field mouse (C),    Royle’s mountain vole (C),    Lesser shrew (C),    ,Migratory hamster (C)

    Birds

    Common birds in the park are:

    Lammegier vulture,    Golden eagle,    Himalayan griffon vulture,    Eurasian black vulture,    Marsh harrier,    Eurasian sparrow hawk,    Eurasian kestrel,    Lesser kestrel,    Saker falcon,    Peregrine falcon,    Himalayan snow cock,    Snow partridge,    Chukar,    Grey heron,    Common sandpiper,    Hill pigeon,    Snow pigeon,    Northern eagle owl,    Eurasian cuckoo,    Common swallow,    Magpie,    Alpine chough,    Raven

    After clearing custom & immigration formalities on the Pakistani side, we board the Governments transportation vehicle to continue our border-crossing – the worlds highest border crossing – into China.

    The town itself has a Tajik and Chinese population and a 14th century Chinese fortress that sits on a rise above the flat-bottomed Tashkurgan River valley.

    Time Permitting,  we will visit Stone fort, located in downtown Tashkurgan. It has a history of more than 2000 years. In times gone by it was the central palace of the Tajik kingdom. Then we will hike around the Tashkurgan grassland and enjoy the scenery of Mt. Mutztah Ata and Mt. Pamir.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • TASHGURKAN – KARAKUL LAKE - KASHGAR

    An exciting day ahead as we start with a three-hour drive to the enchanting Karakul Lake with breathtaking views of the Muztagh Ata (the father of the ice mountains) reflected on the still waters.

    Karakul Lake is 3600 meters above sea level. It is located between Mt. Muztagata  (7546 meters) and Mt. Gonger (7719 meters), which are said to be 2 of the 6 most beautiful mountains in the World. We will visit the local Kyrgyz Yurts and listen to their stories about traditional ways of nomadic mountain life. There is never enough time to take in its beauty before we head off for the historic city of Kashgar located at the western end of the Taklimakan Desert.

    After Karakul lake,  we will arrive in Oytagh Red Mountain>. The mountain valley is surrounded by a beautiful backdrop of multi-coloured mountains topped by snowcapped peaks,  Corner Lake (Bulung Kul) is a tranquil shallow lake where you can take very nice photographs of the lake with stunning reflections of the sand mountains.

    After this Opal village is in sight. It is a good location to take photos of village life and traditional activities like bread making and Uyghur food stalls.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • KASHGHAR

    After breakfast we will start visit of highlights of  Kashgar attractions. Kashgar is an important hub on the Old Silk Road, also a vibrant Islamic centre within China.

    It is the largest oasis city in the Chinese Central Asia, at the western end of the Taklimakan Desert (meaning: going in never return) and ninety per cent of its populations are Uyghur.

    Our first stop will be Kashgar old city. Kashgar old city was the well known center at the crossroads of the Southern and Middle Silk roads in the past. Today, Kashgar Old City is still a cradle of culture, a burning torch to the memories of the past.

    It is without doubt a step-back into the past in which you are a living part. With a history of more than 2000 years, Uighur people have lived here for generations carving out a splendid society in the process.

    Next place will be visit of Apak Hoja Tomb.

    Another name for this sight is Xian Fei Mu (the tomb of the Fragrant Concubine). The construction here is really outstanding as it combines a local Uighur style with Arabic and Persian styles.

    It is said that a total of 72 people belonging to one family of five generations were buried here and it has since been a holy place for local Muslims for more than 350 years.

    After it we will visit largest mosque in China, Idgah Mosque: It is known as  symbol of Kashgar. Usually, 5,000 people gather to pray here five times a day during the week, though this increases to 10,000 on Fridays and between 50,000 and 60,000 at festivals.

    In the evening we will visit a Local Family. Kashgar village population comprises 90% of the total population of Kashgar and we finish today with a visit to there. It is the best way to taste local family style foods and experience real life and culture at the end day.

    Activities: Sightseeing, Cultural Exploration,

  • Urmqi

    After break fast we will drive toward Urmqi. Urmqi, miles from nowhere, mid-way between Rome and Beijing, this exotic oasis used to be the last outfitting station on the centuries-old Silk Road. Trade remains timeless still, at least on Sundays, when the entire community gathers at the world’s liveliest market.

    Ürümqi was a major hub on the Silk Road during China’s Tang dynasty, and developed its reputation as a leading cultural and commercial center during Qing dynasty in 19th Century.

    With an estimated population of 3.5 million in 2015, Ürümqi is the largest city in China’s western interior as well as in Central Asia in terms of the population. Ürümqi has seen a huge economical development since the 1990s and currently serves as a regional transport node, a cultural, political and commercial center.

    In the evening drop off to Hotel /airport.

    End of Services

Departures Dates

No minimum passengers required, 100% guaranteed departures. Small groups. All our itineraries are fully customizable with flexible departure dates.

Pricing Packs

Basic

bed & Breakfast
$ 000
  • 2-3 Stars Hotels
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Standard

Double bed, Meals, Transfer
$ 000
  • 3-4 Stars Hotels, where available
  • Directed Flight
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Premium

All Inclusive
$ 000
  • 5 Stars Hotels, where is available
  • 24/7 Customer Support

Guides

M Ebran
Travel Guide

From early childhood a place somewhere beyond the horizon was where I wanted to be and in the passing years since, I have made it my goal to satisfy that yearning! growing up in Baltistan gave me a great love for that part of the world, from K2 to Nanga Parbat to makin the first venture on Gondogoro la and much in between.

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Extend your holiday

There are many ways you can extend your holiday with us: book extra hotel nights, take a warm-up/accalamatization trek,relax at a beautiful resort,  arrange a personal sightseeing tour or enjoy specialist activities such as paragliding or a history and culture tour.

We’re happy to suggest ideas, provide quotes and make all the arrangements. We can also assist with flight and hotel upgrades. Just call us on +92 (0) 342 9767 963 or email info@visitpakistanonline.com and we will be glad to help.

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